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Mirador Television was created after small scale television in the tiny town of Lewes in the South of England came to a sticky end in 2017 with the collapse of Chalk Television.

But founder Keith Hayes, who has more than fifty years’ experience in media, great and small, refused to give up.

Hayes has worked in media in more than 40 countries as producer, presenter, journalist, consultant, and reporter.

He has done his front-line stuff with 15 years in Northern Ireland at BBC and ITV, followed by a long stint with Reuters Television as London Anchor of the PBS daily coast to coast business programmes Morning and Nightly Business Reports.

He still works with his MBR co-anchor Melissa Conti on Mirador Television. After Reuters, Hayes spent more than a decade in the immediate post war Balkans. Baltic States and the South Caucasus. He was part of the start-up team for Russia Today TV, now simply RT.

He observed in these overseas postings that local radio and television was alive and well in almost every country in the world, except the UK. For some reason, he says, UK governance cannot think micro. It always must be macro. As local media shrinks, so governance gets worse and taxes rise. Hayes determined that his own area Lewes, should have a watchdog. 

Responding to a Harvard University report which confirmed these finding, Mirador Television was born.

Mirador means a little turret or castle.  Chalk TV disappeared under a load of high costs and a volatile market. But the incredible smart phone and computer App explosion now makes small scale broadcasting quite inexpensive, so Mirador is now on the air with a mixture of news, information, and entertainment.

Hayes has a good track record of finding raw talent and turning it into professional competency. So he looked to Lewes for a new team. Eni Verrall popped up. Talented mother of two, Eni is a natural broadcaster but also a good administrator, a much-needed combination for cash strapped local television.

Other locals joined to provide programmes, some of Hayes’s veteran colleagues joined up and Mirador started on its local venture.

Melissa noticed friends in New York were amused by its ‘British Quirkiness’ and so Mirador recently began broadcasting on Roku streaming channel.

As Hayes says, we have the potential of more than 100, million viewers, while we actually have just 2000. But Mirador is growing in content and audience numbers. Nor has it forgotten its roots.

It is still local, but it speaks to nations.

IT IS THE BIGGEST LITTLE TV IN THE WORLD.

Sit back, relax and enjoy whatever it is you’re here for.

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